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20121101
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@journal.org. talk a little bit about proposition 8 in california. as the impact what could happen this time around? guest: let me go back and say, marriage equality is no longer a partisan issue. if you look at socio-economic trends across this country, americans from all walks of life, all parts of this country, all sorts of americans, republicans, democrats, catholics, episcopalians, they all support marriage equality in majority's right now. that is probably one of the largest of allusions of has taken place since 2006 and 2008. you are right. perhaps the most high-profile marriage equality battle took place in 2008 in california around prop 8. unfortunately, we lost by just a few percentage points. as a result of that, prop. 8, a group called the american foundation for equal rights decided to launch a constitutional challenge for that vote. and it stands for is right now before the supreme court and on november 20, they will decide whether or not to take up that case. host: a paul talking about support for gay marriage. referenced that 50% of those who were polled, say it should be on the bal
in santa barbara, california. caller: hello. good morning. i guess my comment is, and kind of glad that the spectacle of elections are over. and maybe we can start to focus on some of the serious issues that still remain. i notice you just made a comment that reid had put out an olive branch to john boehner and mitch mcconnell. i am hoping that at some point in the future that may be c-span can run some segments on the article 5 convention. i really think that we needed to a convention of state delegates to deliberate over certain issues that none of the candidates talked about. i am very concerned about proprietary source codes and electronic voting machines. i am concerned about voter fraud, i am concerned about corporate control of what makes it out of a committee to the floor for a vote and what does not. my comment is, am glad the elections are over. i hope it can start to address some serious issues. host: that is john in santa barbara. usa today lead editorial -- voters can obama a subdued second term mandate. barack obama is election in 2008 made history purity become the f
to california. her family would like to go back. she might still around again because -- she raised $215 million. she is the house's biggest fund- raiser. >> we will end up with a more polarized congress. steny hoyer is more moderate. he is an institutional -- has been around for decades and represents a lot of the new democrats. the big question will be, will party, a caucus dominated by liberals and i would say democrats are much more liberal than your average democrat around the country. will they tolerate steny hoyer who they do not see as one of their own? they see him as a compromiser. >> the white house has been ignoring -- democrats have been an afterthought. if they had a leader, there would have more muscle. >> one thing that i find interesting to watch is when you can step back and look at the bigger picture, you have a house that is not budging and testing republican. which means that how frustrated that american people are about the non action, about the tea party. this means that i think barack obama should be on the losing end of this campaign because the american people want a ch
, there are two in arizona that have yet to be called, 3 in california, 1 in north carolina, and one in florida. these have not been called because ballots are still being counted. mostly overseas and military balance, some early voting, especially in arizona. that is what is still being counted. host: are any of these expected to go to a recount? is it just provisional ballots and absentee ballots? guest: i think a couple will go to recounts. the closest, i believe, is in california in the seventh district. i think that will definitely be going to a recount. also in north carolina, the margin is 400 votes in a race with mike macentire. another is inlflorid awhere allen west is behind by 2400 votes. i think c-span viewers are familiar with him and knows he is not somebody that gives up easily. host: what would be the biggest upset from your perspective from the stresses that have not been called? guest: i think the biggest upset would be the race in arizona's second district which is where ron barber is the incumbent. host: that is the aide to former congressman gabby gifford. guest: this was h
and the california coast. but most will, i will remember the people i have met, their strength, their values, their generosity and hospitality to me and tv and our family. it is very important that we continue to fight for them and for families all across america. we have to fight for that young family in long island, new york. the one that wants to buy a home in the community they grew up in cannot afford it. we have to fight for that family in sioux city, iowa that can afford health insurance to pay the bills for its young son. we have to fight for those high school students in los angeles who are saying no to drugs and yes to their future. we have to open up that door of college opportunity to every young person in this country. [cheers and applause] we have to fight to end the shame of homelessness in this country. we have to fight for those unemployed steelworkers in pennsylvania and youngstown, ohio who want to be able to have a good job and a good wage to support themselves and their families. and we have to fight for those families and met with in california whose children today are
in cakewalks in north carolina and california and other parts of the country that did not need a fund raiser from the house majority leader. but you saw him putting in face time and getting to know these guys on the trail. possibly in hopes of being able to work with them when they get here. >> or perhaps in securing their vote with republican leader elections, which happen to be right around the corner. one thing that they have got overlooked in the broad scheme of the house, would talk about redistricting as evil. but there are some states that have taken a different approach. the number one state that has taken a different approach is california. california has gone to a bipartisan redistricting commission. they drew lines without input of the state legislature, allegedly without the input of the state legislature. over the last decade, 53 seats in california, five house election cycles. 265 elections in california and only one seat out of those 265 times changed hands. now, though, we have seen -- as they are still counting a lot of districts, but we have seen eight or nine competitive s
? michele bachmann? jeb bush did not run. they got stuck with mitt romney. host: california has gone from a republican to a purple to a solid democratic state. what has changed? ronald reagan winning back in 1984. guest: i am proud to take a little bit of credit for that four at one time being the democratic party chair in california. the republican party is a mirror of the national republican party in the sense that i think they lost track of where the country was moving. republican registration in ronald reagan's day was 63.5% republican. today it is less than 30%. democrats did a good job of registering voters, but the republican party lost all of those people by their extreme right-wing philosophy and policies. host: pete wilson on the issue of immigration. why is that a mirror image? guest: we always had a hard time convincing latinos to vote, to register and to vote. we called them the sleeping giant. the sleeping giant woke up. he will send put an anti- immigration initiative on the ballot. the latino community came alive. a registered. now, they are a power in california and many
of ballots are still being counted, 4 million in california alone. sometime today we think we will be officially the winter in florida. -- the winner in florida. as of right now, total turnout and number of voters has increased in colorado, iowa, minnesota, nevada, north carolina, and wisconsin. it looks like it decreased in 35 of 49 battleground states. the total turnout may be higher in 2008 when all the votes are finally counted. as we plan 4, total minority vote share increased to 28%. our coalition turnout, women made up about the same% of the electorate as in 2008. we got if you got% of women voters. for lots of reporting about youth turnout, they continue to turn out and take control of their future. in virginia, we increased our youth percentage. in florida, boating rates increased to 16%, and we got 61% in 2008 and 66% in 2012. african american turnout and support was as high or higher than ever. in ohio, african-americans increased from 11% to 15%. we got somewhere between 9% and 97% in every battle ground state. 71% of latino vote, the highest percentage of latino v
it comes to nontransportation, you'll never guess. who wants to guess? california. who would have thought. >> i would have thought new york. >> exactly. because of subwaist. but this is nontransportation. -- because of subways. but this is nontransportation. 40% of our energy consumption is hvac. heating and cooling buildings, build they be residential, commercial or factory. 35% is transportation. and california in 1978 passed building standards under then governor brown who was known partially for this in the doons burry as governor moonbeam but he got it passed. so every building in california had energy standards and it's made california very efficient. these are the kinds of things -- i said portman and sheheen have been compromising. my view, katrina -- sorry -- sandy gave some impetus to dealing with climate change. and i said in new york we're going to pay for climate change one way or another. we can pay for it after each natural disaster. we in new york have had 50 -- sorry -- we have had 300 or -- sorry. phrasing it wrong. we have had in the last three or four years we have had
in the local proximity. we are now in a global marketplace. i was in california last week. we need to compete across the country. it involves technology, investment in technology. i believe it starts in grades k- 12. talk about jobs between -- for people in their 20s and 30s. if we do not try to be more advanced, we will not be competitive in the global market. >> the middle class here is facing the same problem the middle-class is facing everywhere in the country. our government has not been able to work together because of being controlled by major lobby groups that are not putting in place specific things like comprehensive tax return -- tax reform that makes sense that accumulates revenue and is equitably history. we need to make sure we have comprehensive tax reform that makes sense and address the waste and mismanagement and misallocation of resources we see throughout government as is evidenced in benghazi. we need to address that. we can address that by having more independents there to let the people know there is someone else available to take their place. >> let's move onto the nex
to other races in the country where they could target rick hubble -- republicans. california there have been two factors, which was to turn the congressional map on its head. we are almost able to ignore california even though it is the biggest day, and maybe watch one or two seats. now we're watching a dozen seats to see which party takes control. when it comes to the senate, if you look at the northern part of the country, if you look at montana, north dakota, indiana, and wisconsin, all four of those races are in our categories, and republicans need to win all four of them if they have any hope of getting the majority. in each one of those that they lose, the chance the republicans will gain back control decreases for the perry >> will there be anything that surprise you? our job is toj avoid as many surprises as process. in hopes of we will avoid a surprise, but i would be surprised if there is not a surprise, particularly on the house side. the presidential battleground, i think the senate battle ground, states we know come on the house side, but almost expect there to be a surpris
will be seen in retrospect as something close to the proposition in california. incredibly shortsighted with long-term consequences. whatever those republican governors and legislators thought they were doing, every latino population in the country and thought not only are you not competing for are revoked, you do not want our vote to. the gop is not even getting up to have argument about policies of this point. there is this time of tremendous identity of -- how often do you go to church? there is the identity politics. our system is frozen with the two out of three close presidential elections happening. >> right here. >> janet. george washington university school of public health. there was a lot of discussion on women's issues. i am wondering if you can speak to the role of gender in the governing. we are seeing more candidates who are successful in their elections and one state's -- is entirely female. >> kelly ayote. when you have that kind of coalition and the democratic party and that remarkable picture of the congressional committee of all republican and not white men talking a
of the states that were scared, were not hard hit or some states as far away as california, they have pledged to get the equipment and cruise here into new jersey and new york and connecticut as quickly as possible. one of the things we have been able to do, to give you a sense of how this is an all hands on deck approach, we are able to and c-130's, military transport planes, to move assets and personnel to speed up the process of getting power as soon as possible. our first party is water filtration plants and other critical infrastructure in the state. for that, we have to move some generators, and we have a ship that can help to move assets around the state as well. we are going to be working with governor christie's office and local officials to identify what are those critical infrastructures, how we can get what is needed as quickly as possible. a couple other things we are concerned about. as power starts coming back on, we want to make sure people can get to work. there are a lot of folks in jersey who work in new york, in the city, and other places where transportation may be hobble
a phone call. california democrats line good evening. caller: i'm calling to say that i'm voting for obama because he has been through a whole lot for the first four years. he's trying to straighten out what the republicans has messed up. and i go with obama. host: host: thanks for call. gilbert is a long time reporter for the milwaukee tribbune. we checked in with him what he will be checking out on election night. guest: i think the turn out will be sky high. i'm going to be interested to see what the interplay is between those races or whether they're cooky cutter images because of how polarized these elections have become or whether we get an election that is much more like 2,000 and 2004 in wisconsin at the top of the ticket which was decided by less than half a percentage noint both cases or whether wisconsin is better for democrats than their national numbers which has happened on occasion. so wisconsin swings back and forth between those two patterns and those are things i'll be interested in watching on election night. host: our next call is from wisconsin on the republican line.
not hard hit, or some as far away as california, they have pledged to start getting equipment, crews, et cetera, into new jersey. we were able to get c-17's, c- 130's, military transport planes potentially to move assets, personnel, to speed up the process of getting power up and running as soon as possible. our first priority is water filtration plants and some other critical infrastructure. for that, we have emergency generators. we have a navy ship that has helicopters that can move assets around the state as well. we are going to be working with local officials to identify those critical infrastructure and how we can get what is needed as quickly as possible. a couple of other things we are concerned about, as power starts coming back on, we want to make sure people can also get to work. a lot folks in jersey work in new york come in the city, and in other places where transportation may be hobbled. one of the things i mentioned is the possibility of us using federal assets, and military assets as well as taking inventory of the country that can be brought in so we can help people ge
organizations. it features the involvement of a professor from university of california san diego. it is working with local communities to rethink and refrain the perceptions and understandings of neighborhoods , and personal security. there are a lot of approaches to changing perceptions and changing the securities sector. that is an addition to the high- level policy stuff that we discussed. >> thank you. you have anything -- ok. let's take this as our final question. i have one more, very last question to pose to our panel. >> good morning. i am an independent researcher and consultant on issues mainly around the police and conflict. my question is aimed primarily at a bob. i will tweet it for egypt and tunisia. a paper highlighted the problems and challenges in libya in conducting operations with a light footprint. it is not kosovo or iraq model where we had tens of thousands of people on the ground. my question and for bob is, what are our considerations with engagement or post-conflict ssr? what can we do during the conflict to set the stage for post-conflict to get on the ground, whether
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)